Travelling to Rhodes - Covid-19 Information

Driving in Rhodes

With an area of about 1412 square kilometers, Rhodes is one of the largest islands in Greece. The driving distance from it’s most northern part - Rhodes Town - to the south point - Prasonisi - is 92Km or 108Km depending on the route you will choose.

Driving in Rhodes © Rhodes Guide / RhodesGuide.com

Rhodes has a dense road network. Although most of the roads in Rhodes are in good condition, there are some things you should have knowledge of.

Rhodes is not a small island. Some locations will require you to drive an hour or maybe more. If you are planning to go to many places, avoid renting a scooter and go for the safety of a car. Although the roads are in a good condition, many of them are narrow at some points. Scooters with low speed can therefore become an obstacle to other drivers.

  • If you are not familiar with driving a scooter or a motorbike, don't rent one, just because you happen to have a driving license valid for such vehicles. You are much better off with a car. If you can't afford a car, use the public transportation services or a taxi.
  • The use of seat belts in cars and helmets on motorbikes and scooters is enforced by law. If you get cought not wearing a seat belt or helmet you will be forced to pay a fine.
  • Don't drink and drive. It is dangerous not only for you, but for others that may get in your way as well. Getting cought drunk behind the wheel can cat you into real trouble, depending on the amount of alcohol found in your system.
  • Do not forget to get a decent map :-) 

For more information about driving on the island, as well as car hire possibilities, you can read our magazine article 

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